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Katharine Donnelly Adams

kda11 AT psu.edu

Katharine Donnelly Adams is a researcher in the Bilingualism and Language Development Lab at Penn State University.  She received her M.A.T and Ph.D. from the Eliot-Pearson Department of Human Development and Child Study at Tufts University.  She was a Research Teacher at Benchmark School, where she helped to develop the Word Detectives program, and at the Center for Reading and Language Research at Tufts, where she was a co-author and lead teacher for RAVE-O.  Her doctoral research focused on how to best deliver research-based interventions to students and teachers through summer programming and training.  These experiences highlighted the importance of second language learning and bilingualism for many students in reading development.  To address these questions, her post-doctoral studies use neurocognitive and behavioral methods to investigate how children and adults learn second languages in the classroom.  A primary goal of this research is to share results with teachers, schools, and families to better inform educational practices.

Sarah Grey

seg24 AT psu.edu

Sarah Grey is a postdoctoral researcher at the Center for Language Science at The Pennsylvania State University. She received her Ph.D. from Georgetown University where she worked with Drs. Cristina Sanz and Michael Ullman on the effects of immersion experience on additional language development, the neurocognition of late-learned language, and the role of bilingualism in adult additional language learning. At Penn State she studies neuropragmatic effects of speaker identity and listener experience in bilingualism.

Megan Zirnstein

mkz2 AT psu.edu


Megan is a postdoctoral researcher at the Center for Language Science at Pennsylvania State University. She received her M.A. and Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of California, Davis. Her past research has centered on the following topics: (1) individual differences in reading behavior and comprehension ability, and (2) the behavioral and neural correlates of psycholinguistic phenomena in sentence processing, particularly at the syntax-semantics interface. At the CLS, she will be extending her work in monolinguals to investigate how cognitive control affects semantic prediction in second language sentence processing.
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